A new study has identified these as the main factors that make it more likely that patients will suffer long term from the coronavirus.

Study identifies factors that cause ‘long Covid’

“It’s important we use the knowledge we have gained from the first wave in the pandemic to reduce the long-term impact of the second. This research could already pave the way for preventative and treatment strategies for long Covid.”

CAPE TOWN – Older, overweight people, women, those with asthma and those with a greater number of different symptoms in the first week of their illness are more likely to develop “long Covid.”

 

A new study has identified these as the main factors that make it more likely that patients will suffer long term from the coronavirus.

 

The lead researchers, Dr. Claire Steves and epidemiologist Tim Spector, said the study could be used to help target early interventions and research aimed at preventing and treating long Covid.

 

“It’s important we use the knowledge we have gained from the first wave in the pandemic to reduce the long-term impact of the second. This research could already pave the way for preventative and treatment strategies for long Covid. We urge everyone to join the effort by downloading the app and taking just a minute every day to log your health,” said Steves.

 

SEE ALSO: ‘LONG COVID’ MAY AFFECT MULTIPLE PARTS OF THE BODY

 

Several researchers are carrying out studies in the area of “Long Covid” or the long-term impact of Covid-19 in patients. A report from the Britain’s National Institute for Health Research last week showed that “long Covid” may take the form of up to four syndromes, which may affect the body and mind both.

 

The research also found one common concern among patients – that the symptoms first arise in one organ such as the lung or the heart, subside and appear again in a different physiological area, according to Reuters. Some of the patients were also ill for more than seven months.

 

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