Most workers today feel disconnected and overworked. Photo by Marcus Aurelius from Pexels

Workers feel disconnected & overworked, reveals survey

“Our research highlights a gaping chasm between what executives think they are offering their employees and how those employees feel.”

CAPE TOWN – A new research by the IBM Institute for Business Value, reveals how employees feel the current working situation in response to Covid-19.

According to the IBM report, most workers feel disconnected and overworked.

“Our research highlights a gaping chasm between what executives think they are offering their employees and how those employees feel,” said the report.

The report also found that many bosses are pleased with how well they’ve handled the move to remote working in response to Covid-19 and are confident their teams are getting the support and training they need.

To gather the data for the survey, the researchers interviewed 3,450 executives in 20 countries, including 400 CEOs in the United States. They also sent online questionnaires to 50,000 people in eight countries.

The resulting information paints a different picture to pre-pandemic surveys that showed many people thought working from home would be preferable to commuting to work.

SEE ALSO: Why you are doing more work than usual during lockdown

In another survey led by the Workforce Institute at UKG (Ultimate Kronos Group) and Workplace Intelligence, discovered that burnout and fatigue are equally concerning for employees working remotely (43 percent) and those in a physical workplace (43 percent).

 Overall, three in five (59 percent) employees and business leaders say their organization has taken at least some measures to guard against burnout, though nearly a third (29 percent) of employees wish organizations would act with more empathy.

“We see that mothers are really struggling. We see that senior women are feeling burnt out, exhausted, like they always have to be on, and we’re seeing that Black women are having additional challenges on top of challenges they already faced in the workplace,” said Jess Huang.

Meanwhile, The World Health Organisation is classifying post-viral fatigue syndrome under the section of “diseases of the nervous system”. It’s defined as a complex medical condition, characterised by long-term fatigue and other symptoms. These symptoms are to such a degree that they limit a person’s ability to carry out ordinary daily activities.

 

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